Kidney Stones (Holistic) – Health Information Library (2023)

About This Condition

Find the source and stop the pain of kidney stones. Hard masses that grow from crystals forming in the kidneys, they typically cause severe back pain that may radiate to the groin area. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful.

About

About This Condition

Kidney stones are hard masses that can grow from crystals forming within the kidneys. Doctors call kidney stones “renal calculi,” and the condition of having such stones “nephrolithiasis.”

Most kidney stones are made of calcium oxalate. People with a history of kidney stone formation should talk with their doctor to learn what type of stones they have—approximately one stone in three is made of something other than calcium oxalate and one in five contains little if any calcium in any form. Calcium oxalate stone formation is rare in primitive societies, suggesting that this condition is preventable.1 People who have formed a calcium oxalate stone are at high risk of forming another kidney stone.

The information included in this article pertains to prevention of calcium oxalate kidney stone recurrence only—not to other kidney stones or to the treatment of acute disease. The term “kidney stone” will refer only to calcium oxalate stones. However, information regarding how natural substances affect urinary levels of calcium may also be important for people with a history of calcium phosphate stones.

Symptoms

Kidney stones often cause severe back or flank pain, which may radiate down to the groin region. Sometimes kidney stones are accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms, chills, fever, and blood in urine.

Eating Right

The right diet is the key to managing many diseases and to improving general quality of life. For this condition, scientific research has found benefit in the following healthy eating tips.

Recommendation Why
Ask your doctor about bran

Bran, a rich source of insoluble fiber, reduces calcium absorption, which in turn reduces calcium in the urine. Ask your doctor if supplementing with bran is right for you.

Bran, a rich source of insoluble fiber, reduces the absorption of calcium, which in turn causes urinary calcium to fall. In one trial, risk of forming kidney stones was significantly reduced simply by adding one-half ounce of rice bran per day to the diet. Oat and wheat bran are also good sources of insoluble fiber and are available in natural food stores and supermarkets. Before supplementing with bran, however, people should check with a doctor, because some people—even a few with kidney stones—don’t absorb enough calcium. For those people, supplementing with bran might deprive them of much-needed calcium.

Drink lemonade

Lemons are high in citric acid, which may protect against kidney stones. One study found that drinking 2 liters of lemonade per day helped prevent kidney stones.

Citric acid (citrate) is found in many foods and may also protect against kidney stone formation. The best food source commonly available is citrus fruits, particularly lemons. One study found that drinking 2 liters (approximately 2 quarts) of lemonade per day improved the quality of the urine in ways that are associated with kidney stone prevention. Lemonade was far more effective in modifying these urinary parameters than orange juice. In another study, drinking 2 liters of lemonade per day for an average of aboutfour years decreased the recurrence rate of kidney stones by 87%. However, that improvement was not statistically significant, because of the small number of patients treated. The lemonade was made by mixing 4 oz lemon juice with enough water to make 2 liters. The smallest amount of sweetener possible should be added to make the taste acceptable.

Drink plenty of fluids

Water and most fruit juices can help dilute the substances in the urine that form kidney stones

Drinking water increases the volume of urine. In the process, substances that form kidney stones are diluted, reducing the risk of kidney stone recurrence. For this reason, people with a history of kidney stones should drink at least two quarts per day. It is particularly important that people in hot climates increase their fluid intake to reduce their risk.

Eat more fruits and veggies

Potassium reduces the amount of calcium lost in the urine, and therefore may reduce the risk of kidney stones. The best way to get more potassium is to eat fruits and vegetables.

Potassium reduces urinary calcium excretion, and people who eat high amounts of dietary potassium appear to be at low risk of forming kidney stones. Most kidney stone research involving potassium supplementation uses the form potassium citrate. When a group of stone formers was given 5 grams of potassium citrate three times daily in addition to their regular drug treatment for 28 months, they had a significantly lower rate of stone recurrence compared to those taking potassium for only eight months and to those taking no potassium at all. Although citrate itself may lower the risk of stone recurrence (see below), in some potassium research, a significant decrease in urinary calcium occurs even in the absence of added citrate. This finding suggests that increasing potassium itself may reduce the risk of kidney stone recurrence. The best way to increase potassium is to eat fruits and vegetables. The level of potassium in food is much higher than the small amounts found in supplements.

Steer clear of sugar

People who form kidney stones have been reported to process sugar abnormally. As a result, some doctors recommend that people who form stones avoid sugar.

People who form kidney stones have been reported to process sugar abnormally. Sugar has also been reported to increase urinary oxalate, and in some reports, urinary calcium as well. As a result, some doctors recommend that people who form stones avoid sugar. To what extent, if any, such a dietary change decreased the risk of stone recurrence has not been studied and remains unclear.

Try a vegetarian diet

Vegetarians have been reported to be at lower risk for kidney stones.

Increased levels of urinary calcium increase the risk of stone formation. Consumption of animal protein from meat, dairy, poultry, or fish increases urinary calcium. Perhaps for this reason, consumption of animal protein has been linked to an increased risk of forming stones and vegetarians have been reported to be at lower risk for stone formation in some reports. As a result, many researchers and some doctors believe that people with a history of kidney stone formation should restrict intake of animal foods high in protein.

In one controlled trial, contrary to expectations, after 4.5 years of follow-up, those who restricted their dietary protein actually had an increased risk of forming a kidney stone, compared with the control group. The findings of this trial conflict with the outcomes of most preliminary studies, and need to be confirmed by further clinical trials. Other researchers have found that a low-protein diet reduces the risk of forming stones. Although high-protein diets should probably be avoided by people with kidney stones, the effect of restricting dietary protein to low levels (below the RDA level of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day) remains unclear. Until more is known, it makes sense to consume a diet with a moderate amount of protein, perhaps partially limiting animal protein, but not limiting protein from vegetarian sources, such as nuts and beans.

Use coffee or tea cautiously

Coffee and tea increase urinary oxalate excretion, possibly increasing risk of stones. However, observational studies have associated drinking more of either with lower risk. None of this research is strong, so coffee and tea’s role in stone formation is unclear.

Drinking coffee or other caffeine-containing beverages increases urinary calcium. Long-term caffeine consumers are reported to have an increased risk of osteoporosis, suggesting that the increase in urinary calcium caused by caffeine consumption may be significant. However, coffee consists mostly of water, and increasing water consumption is known to reduce the risk of forming a kidney stone. While many doctors are concerned about the possible negative effects of caffeine consumption in people with a history of kidney stones, preliminary studies in both men and women have found that coffee and tea consumption is actually associated with a reduced risk of forming a kidney stone. These reports suggest that the helpful effect of consuming more water by drinking coffee or tea may compensate for the theoretically harmful effect that caffeine has in elevating urinary calcium. Therefore, the bulk of current research suggests that it is not important for kidney stone formers to avoid coffee and tea.

Eat the right diet with certain supplements

In one study, recurrence rate of kidney stones dropped when people restricted salt, sugar, animal protein, and foods rich in oxalate, and after people supplemented with potassium citrate and magnesium citrate.

Some citrate research conducted with people who have a history of kidney stones involves supplementation with a combination of potassium citrate and magnesium citrate. In one double-blind trial, the recurrence rate of kidney stones dropped from 64% to 13% for those receiving high amounts of both supplements. In that trial, people were instructed to take six pills per day—enough potassium citrate to provide 1,600 mg of potassium and enough magnesium citrate to provide 500 mg of magnesium. Both placebo and citrate groups were also advised to restrict salt, sugar, animal protein, and foods rich in oxalate. Other trials have also shown that potassium and magnesium citrate supplementation reduces kidney stone recurrences.

Sidestep salt

Some doctors recommend that people with a history of kidney stones reduce salt intake, but to what extent that would reduce stone recurrence remains unclear.

Salt increases urinary calcium excretion in stone formers. In theory, this should increase the risk of forming a stone. As a result, some researchers have suggested that reducing dietary salt may be a useful way to decrease the chance of forming additional stones. Increasing dietary salt has also affected a variety of other risk factors in ways that suggest an increased chance of kidney stone formation. Some doctors recommend that people with a history of kidney stones reduce salt intake. To what extent such a dietary change would reduce the risk of stone recurrence remains unclear.

Avoid foods with oxalates that can help stones form

Limit your intake of spinach, rhubarb, beet greens, nuts, chocolate, almonds, peanuts, and strawberries, which appear to significantly increase urinary oxalate levels.

Increasing dietary oxalate can lead to an increase in urinary oxalate excretion. Increased urinary oxalate increases the risk of stone formation. As a result, most doctors agree that kidney stone formers should reduce their intake of oxalate from food as a way to reduce urinary oxalate. Many foods contain oxalate; however, only a few—spinach, rhubarb, beet greens, nuts, chocolate, tea, bran, almonds, peanuts, and strawberries—appear to significantly increase urinary oxalate levels.

Avoid grapefruit juice

Drinking grapefruit juice has been linked to an increased risk of kidney stones in two large studies.

Drinking grapefruit juice has been linked to an increased risk of kidney stones in two large studies. Whether grapefruit juice actually causes kidney stone recurrence or is merely associated with something else that increases risks remains unclear; some doctors suggest that people with a history of stones should restrict grapefruit juice intake until more is known.

Halt the soda habit

The phosphoric acid found in soft drinks is thought to affect calcium metabolism in ways that might increase kidney stone recurrence risk.

The findings of some but not all studies suggest that consumption of soft drinks may increase the risk of forming a kidney stone. The phosphoric acid found in these beverages is thought to affect calcium metabolism in ways that might increase kidney stone recurrence risk.

(Video) How To Make The Great Kidney 'Spring Clean' Juice || HEALTH HACK

Supplements

What Are Star Ratings?

Supplement Why

3 Stars

Magnesium Citrate and Potassium Citrate (Abdominal Pain)

1,600 mg daily potassium as citrate and 500 mg daily of magnesium as citrate

Supplementing with a combination of potassium citrate and magnesium citrate may reduce the recurrence rate of kidney stones.

Some citrate research conducted with people who have a history of kidney stones involves supplementation with a combination of potassium citrate and magnesium citrate. In one double-blind trial, the recurrence rate of kidney stones dropped from 64% to 13% for those receiving high amounts of both supplements. In that trial, people were instructed to take six pills per day—enough potassium citrate to provide 1,600 mg of potassium and enough magnesium citrate to provide 500 mg of magnesium. Both placebo and citrate groups were also advised to restrict salt, sugar, animal protein, and foods rich in oxalate. Other trials have also shown that potassium and magnesium citrate supplementation reduces kidney stone recurrences.

2 Stars

IP-6

120 mg daily

IP-6 (inositol hexaphosphate, also called phytic acid) reduces urinary calcium levels and may reduce the risk of forming a kidney stone.

IP-6 (inositol hexaphosphate, also called phytic acid) reduces urinary calcium levels and may reduce the risk of forming a kidney stone. In one trial, 120 mg per day of IP-6 for 15 days significantly reduced the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in the urine of people with a history of kidney stone formation.

1 Star

Chondroitin Sulfate

Refer to label instructions

Chondroitin sulfate may help reduce the risk of kidney stone formation. One trial found that glycosamionoglycans significantly lowered urinary oxalate levels, which reduces the risk of stone formation.

Chondroitin sulfate may play a role in reducing the risk of kidney stone formation. One trial found 60 mg per day of glycosamionoglycans significantly lowered urinary oxalate levels in stone formers. Chondroitin sulfate is a type of glycosaminoglycan. A decrease in urinary oxalate levels should reduce the risk of stone formation.

1 Star

Pumpkin Seeds

Refer to label instructions

Two trials from Thailand reported that eating pumpkin seeds reduces urinary risk factors for forming kidney stones.

Two trials from Thailand reported that eating pumpkin seeds reduces urinary risk factors for forming kidney stones. One of those trials, which studied the effects of pumpkin seeds on indicators of the risk of stone formation in children, used 60 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight—the equivalent of only a fraction of an ounce per day for an adult. The active constituents of pumpkin seeds responsible for this action have not been identified.

1 Star

Vitamin B6

Refer to label instructions

Taking vitamin B6 with magnesium can inhibit oxalate stone formation.

Both magnesium and vitamin B6 are used by the body to convert oxalate into other substances. Vitamin B6 deficiency leads to an increase in kidney stones as a result of elevated urinary oxalate. Vitamin B6 is also known to reduce elevated urinary oxalate in some stone formers who are not necessarily B6 deficient.

Years ago, the Merck Manual recommended 100–200 mg of vitamin B6 and 200 mg of magnesium per day for some kidney stone formers with elevated urinary oxalate. Most trials have shown that supplementing with magnesium and/or vitamin B6 significantly lowers the risk of forming kidney stones. Results have varied from only a slight reduction in recurrences to a greater than 90% decrease in recurrences.

Optimal supplemental levels of vitamin B6 and magnesium for people with kidney stones remain unknown. Some doctors advise 200–400 mg per day of magnesium. While the effective intake of vitamin B6 appears to be as low as 10–50 mg per day, certain people with elevated urinary oxalate may require much higher amounts, and therefore require medical supervision. In some cases, as much as 1,000 mg of vitamin B6 per day (a potentially toxic level) has been used successfully.

Doctors who do advocate use of magnesium for people with a history of stone formation generally suggest the use of magnesium citrate because citrate itself reduces kidney stone recurrences. As with calcium supplementation, it appears important to take magnesium with meals in order for it to reduce kidney stone risks by lowering urinary oxalate.

1 Star

Vitamin E

Refer to label instructions

In one study, supplementing with synthetic vitamin E was found to reduce several risk factors for kidney stone formation in people with elevated levels of urinary oxalate.

In a double-blind trial, supplementation with 200 IU of synthetic vitamin E per day was found to reduce several risk factors for kidney stone formation in people with elevated levels of urinary oxalate.

References

1. Blacklock N. Renal stone. In: Western Diseases: Their Emergence and Prevention, ed. DP Burkitt and HC Trowell. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Press, 1981, 60–70.

(Video) How to Get Rid of Kidney Stones!
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Last Review: 06-08-2015

Kidney Stones (Holistic) – Health Information Library (1)

Copyright © 2022 TraceGains, Inc. All rights reserved.

Learn more about TraceGains, the company.

The information presented by TraceGains is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2022.

Topic Contents

  • About This Condition
  • About
  • Eating Right
  • Supplements
  • References
(Video) Is it safe to drink tea with kidney stones?

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FAQs

How do humans dissolve kidney stones naturally? ›

Natural Remedies to Pass Kidney Stones
  1. Drink plenty of water. Kidney stones need to be flushed out of the body so be sure to drink lots of water to keep them moving along. ...
  2. Drink a mixture of lemon juice and olive oil. ...
  3. Try raw apple cider vinegar. ...
  4. Eat diuretic foods.
16 Jul 2021

What is the fastest way to dissolve a kidney stone? ›

What Dissolves Kidney Stones Fast? Apple cider vinegar contains acetic acid which helps dissolve kidney stones. In addition to flushing out the kidneys, apple cider vinegar can also decrease any pain caused by the stones. In addition, water and lemon juice can help flush the stones and prevent future kidney stones.

Does magnesium dissolve kidney stones? ›

Magnesium for the Prevention and Treatment of Kidney Stones

And, magnesium citrate is also effective in inhibiting the type of crystals which make up kidney stones. Magnesium keeps calcium dissolved in the blood so it will not form kidney stones.

What vitamins prevent kidney stones? ›

Years ago, the Merck Manual recommended 100–200 mg of vitamin B6 and 200 mg of magnesium per day for some kidney stone formers with elevated urinary oxalate. Most trials have shown that supplementing with magnesium and/or vitamin B6 significantly lowers the risk of forming kidney stones.

What melts kidney stone? ›

Dissolving uric acid stones

Uric acid stones are the only type of kidney stones that can sometimes be dissolved with the help of medication. Alkaline citrate salts or sodium bicarbonate are considered for this purpose, and sometimes allopurinol.

How long does it take for vinegar to dissolve a kidney stone? ›

How long does apple cider vinegar take to work on kidney stones? On average, this takes 45 days. Larger stones can take to a year for them to do so.

What foods cause kidney stones? ›

Avoid stone-forming foods: Beets, chocolate, spinach, rhubarb, tea, and most nuts are rich in oxalate, which can contribute to kidney stones. If you suffer from stones, your doctor may advise you to avoid these foods or to consume them in smaller amounts.

How do I know my kidney stone is stuck? ›

If a kidney stone becomes lodged in the ureters, it may block the flow of urine and cause the kidney to swell and the ureter to spasm, which can be very painful. At that point, you may experience these symptoms: Severe, sharp pain in the side and back, below the ribs. Pain that radiates to the lower abdomen and groin.

Does vitamin D increase kidney stones? ›

Since vitamin D may increase kidney stone formation through an increase in urine calcium excretion, the evaluation of urinary calcium excretion after vitamin D supplementation is a major concern.

Can I take vitamin D if I have kidney stones? ›

These new studies reveal that the old myth of vitamin D leading to kidney stones is unfounded. If the fear of kidney stones is preventing you from taking vitamin D supplements, rest easy and take the supplements you may need to achieve a healthy vitamin D level.

What mineral reduces kidney stones? ›

Calcium oxalate kidney stone formers are invariably advised to increase their fluid intake. In addition, magnesium therapy is often administered. Recently, a prospective study showed that a high dietary intake of calcium reduces the risk of symptomatic kidney stones.

How can 100% prevent kidney stones? ›

The most important thing to do to prevent kidney stones is to drink plenty of water, which helps flush compounds out of the kidneys before they can start making trouble. Reduce salt. Excessive sodium intake can also concentrate the urine, making stone formation more likely. Eat your veggies.

What drinks to avoid with kidney stones? ›

Tart drinks like lemonade, limeade, and fruit juices are naturally high in citrate that helps keep kidney stones at bay. But hold back on foods and drinks flavored with sugar or, especially, high-fructose corn syrup. They can lead to stones.

What is the main cause of getting kidney stones? ›

Possible causes include drinking too little water, exercise (too much or too little), obesity, weight loss surgery, or eating food with too much salt or sugar. Infections and family history might be important in some people. Eating too much fructose correlates with increasing risk of developing a kidney stone.

How much apple cider vinegar should I take for kidney stones? ›

The acetic acid in apple cider vinegar helps kidney stones dissolve. Add 2 tablespoons to 6-8 ounces of water and drink it throughout the day to reap the benefits.

Which plant is used for kidney stone? ›

Nigella sativa. Nigella sativa has been used in Iranian traditional medicine for treatment of urinary stones [33,34,78,79].

What is the best medicine to dissolve kidney stones? ›

Your doctor may prescribe potassium citrate to help prevent kidney stones from growing larger or returning. Potassium citrate can also be used to help dissolve and prevent uric acid kidney stones.

How much lemon juice should I drink for kidney stones? ›

In a recent study conducted by Sur, lemonade therapy – drinking four ounces of reconstituted lemon juice in two liters of water per day – was shown to decrease the rate of stone formation from 1.00 to 0.13 stones per patient.

What are 2 ways to get rid of kidney stones? ›

Treatment
  • Drinking water. Drinking as much as 2 to 3 quarts (1.8 to 3.6 liters) a day will keep your urine dilute and may prevent stones from forming. ...
  • Pain relievers. Passing a small stone can cause some discomfort. ...
  • Medical therapy. Your doctor may give you a medication to help pass your kidney stone.
3 Jun 2022

Is there a way to break up kidney stones without surgery? ›

Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is a technique for treating stones in the kidney and ureter that does not require surgery. Instead, high energy shock waves are passed through the body and used to break stones into pieces as small as grains of sand.

Can you reverse a kidney stone? ›

It is possible to treat kidney stones using fluid therapy and pain medications. However, stones can get stuck in the urinary tract or damage the urinary tissues. This obstruction usually requires immediate surgery or another medical procedure to break up the stone.

Which fruit is good for kidney stone? ›

6. Increase your intake of citrus fruits and juices. Citrate in these foods inhibits stone formation by binding to calcium, which makes it unable to bind with oxalates and form stones. Lemon and lime have been proven to be best sources of citrate, followed by oranges and then grapefruits.

What drinks trigger kidney stones? ›

Dark cola beverages, artificial fruit punch, and sweet tea are the top drinks that contribute to kidney stones. This is because these beverages contain higher amounts of fructose or phosphoric acid, which are ultimately known to contribute to kidney stones.

What foods cure kidney stones? ›

Diet and Calcium Stones
  • Drink plenty of fluids, particularly water.
  • Eat less salt. ...
  • Have only 2 or 3 servings a day of foods with a lot of calcium, such as milk, cheese, yogurt, oysters, and tofu.
  • Eat lemons or oranges, or drink fresh lemonade. ...
  • Limit how much protein you eat. ...
  • Eat a low-fat diet.
10 Aug 2020

How long does it take a kidney stone to move out? ›

How long does it take to pass a kidney stone? The amount of time it can take for you to pass a kidney stone is different from another's. A stone that's smaller than 4 mm (millimeters) may pass within one to two weeks. A stone that's larger than 4 mm could take about two to three weeks to completely pass.

Can stress cause kidney stones? ›

Can stress cause kidney stones? Especially when combined with chronic dehydration, stress can trigger the formation of kidney stones. Stress overall can affect your kidneys. Stress can result in high blood pressure and high blood sugar, which can both affect the health of your heart and the kidneys.

How long can a kidney stone stay in the bladder? ›

A stone can remain in the kidney for years or decades without causing any symptoms or damage to the kidney. Typically, the stone will eventually move through the urinary tract (figure 1) and is passed out of the body in the urine.

What medications make kidney stones worse? ›

Certain prescription medications increase your risk of getting kidney stones, especially if you've already had stones. For example, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (Topamax, Qsymia, Diamox, Neptazane, and Daranide) can cause a condition called metabolic acidosis.

Does coffee help kidney stones? ›

“Our findings show that going from, for example, one cup a day to 1.5 cups per day, reduces the risk of kidney stones by 40 percent,” said co-author of the study, Susanna C. Larsson, PhD, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.

Can too much vitamin d3 cause kidney stones? ›

The main consequence of vitamin D toxicity is a buildup of calcium in your blood (hypercalcemia), which can cause nausea and vomiting, weakness, and frequent urination. Vitamin D toxicity might progress to bone pain and kidney problems, such as the formation of calcium stones.

Can you take B12 if you have kidney stones? ›

The B vitamins which include thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, B6 and B12 have not been shown to be harmful to people with kidney stones. In fact, some studies have shown that B6 may actually help people with high urine oxalate.

Does zinc cause kidney stones? ›

One: Zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones; and two: It alters the surfaces of crystals which encourages further growth.

Which calcium supplement is best for kidney stones? ›

The preferred calcium supplement for people at risk of stone formation is calcium citrate because it helps to increase urinary citrate excretion. We recommend a dose of 200–400 mg if dietary calcium cannot be increased.

Can you reduce kidney stones naturally? ›

By increasing the amount of calcium-rich foods you eat, you may reduce your chance of the most common type of kidney stone, a calcium-oxalate stone. Good calcium-rich options include low-fat cheese, low-fat milk and low-fat yogurt.

What juice is good for kidneys? ›

To get the best health benefits, be sure to choose 100% organic water-based cranberry juice. So how does cranberry juice help? It can prevent bacteria from sticking to the walls of your kidneys, which helps prevent an infection from forming in the first place.

Will lemon dissolve kidney stones? ›

Lemon juice is often utilized to pass kidney stones because it contains citric acid, which can break down small kidney stones. Citric acid is one of the most commonly found acids in fruits and vegetables and can break down kidney stones by forming soluble citrate salts.

Are lemons good for kidneys? ›

Lemons contain citrate, which helps prevent calcium from building up and forming stones in your kidneys. Interestingly, the benefit doesn't seem to be present in oranges, making lemon a unique tool in kidney stone prevention.

Is banana good for kidney stone? ›

Potassium present in bananas helps in balancing the calcium and oxalate content thereby reducing the chances of kidney stones. Potassium also helps in keeping the urine acidity in check. Thus, eating one banana every day can bring about a major relief in your condition of kidney stones.

Is pineapple good for kidney stones? ›

Pineapples. Low-potassium food option that helps lower blood pressure, which is a common complication of severe kidney disease. Contains bromelain, a digestive enzyme that helps dissolve kidney stones in the body.

Does coffee cause kidney stones? ›

Excessive caffeine

Too much caffeine can cause a range of health problems, including kidney stones. Excessive intake of coffee, tea and soda can stress out the kidneys, leading to higher calcium levels in the urine.

Can you completely dissolve a kidney stone? ›

Drawing knowledge from the fields of geology, microscopy, and medicine and using many advanced technologies, a new study finds that kidney stones can and do, in fact, dissolve.

Do kidney stones eventually dissolve? ›

Water helps dissolve small stones

Dr. Lesani recommends drinking about three liters of water per day to help your kidney stones pass on their own. Even when you drink sufficient water, however, kidney stones don't dissolve overnight. In fact, even small stones can take weeks to months to pass.

What foods get rid of kidney stones? ›

Diet and Calcium Stones
  • Drink plenty of fluids, particularly water.
  • Eat less salt. ...
  • Have only 2 or 3 servings a day of foods with a lot of calcium, such as milk, cheese, yogurt, oysters, and tofu.
  • Eat lemons or oranges, or drink fresh lemonade. ...
  • Limit how much protein you eat. ...
  • Eat a low-fat diet.
8 Oct 2020

Does lemon juice really dissolve kidney stones? ›

Lemon juice is often utilized to pass kidney stones because it contains citric acid, which can break down small kidney stones. Citric acid is one of the most commonly found acids in fruits and vegetables and can break down kidney stones by forming soluble citrate salts.

How do you get rid of kidney stones permanently? ›

The main types of surgery for removing kidney stones are: shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) ureteroscopy. percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL)

How can I get my kidney stone to move out? ›

The best home remedy to encourage the stone to pass is to drink lots of fluids, especially plain water and citrus juices such as orange or grapefruit. The extra fluid causes you to urinate more, which helps the stone move and keeps it from growing. You should aim for at least 2 to 3 quarts of water per day.

Which drink reduces kidney stones? ›

Drinking lemonade is one of five ways you can prevent kidney stones, according to Roger L. Sur, MD, director of UC San Diego Comprehensive Kidney Stone Center. Additionally, you can drink plenty of fluids and reduce your intake of salt, dietary calcium and protein.

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